Bike Maintenance Guide

The best thing you can do to upgrade or improve any bike is the tyres, this will make the biggest difference to your cycle, making it an easier and faster ride.

Tyres
I see a lot of people cycling around with tyres not at the right pressure, I also used to do this as a kid and its only now I can see the error of my ways. Put some air in your tyres and not only that, put the right pressure in. Most tyres will give you a PSI range on the side:
20170829_201326
In the example it shows a range of 60-80 PSI, I normally go for the higher end of the range, you can really feel the difference!

If you are cycling on the road then you need less grip and thinner tyres in general. If you are offroad then more grip and thicker tyres is normally the answer. People who have a hybrid bike or do a bit of both then there are many tyres that fit inbetween to give you the best experience. You can purchase tyres from sites like wiggle or sometimes the best bet if your not quite sure is to go to your local bike shop, tell them what you are using it for and your budget then they will recommend something that works.

Wheels
Next we have the wheels, they consists of a hub in the middle, some spokes and a rim a similar size to your tyre. When I first purchased my hybrid bike the wheels were reasonably cheap and I had a lot of problems with them going wonky. Normally this is because some of the spokes have gone a bit loose. The spokes all need to be at the same tension and a spoke key can be used to tighten or loosen spokes but this is very fiddly balancing them to the right tension. I found it was worth spending a bit of money on a decent set of wheels to keep you on the straight and narrow.

MORE TO COME

Giant Box One Full Suspension Downhill Mountain Bike Information

INTRODUCTION

I was given one of these bikes many years ago for christmas (1997), it has served me well over the years and I was shocked to see that the internet is pretty empty for information on this fine machine. I am going to dedicate this page to compiling facts and specs from the original design. I have also collected some pictures in the gallery at the end of the page. The 1998 version was blue/yellow with Magura hydraulic rim brakes and RST front dampers. The 1999 version was red/black with diatech disc brakes and Suntour front forks.

FRAME

Firstly it was sold in the standard frame sizes Giant full suspension bikes are sold in these days.
-Size
-Measurement
-Approx height range

-Small
-16.5”
-5ft 3 – 5ft 6

-Medium
-18.5”
-5ft 6 – 5ft 11

-Large
-20.5”
-5ft 11 – 6ft 2

-XL
-22.5”
-6ft 2 plus

The most common is the 18.5″.

Made from alloy, none of this aluminium/carbon malarky you get nowdays 😛
6061 T6 Aluminium

ORIGINAL SPECS

Blue box one:

Model: Giant Box One ’98 Freeride series, blue – yellow
Frame: 6061 T6 Aluminium 21.5 inch, full suspension, V form
Shifters: SRAM ESP 7.0, 3×9 gripshift gears
Derailleur: SRAM ESP 5.0, 3×9 front and rear derailers
Suspension:
Front: RST 381DH, oversized
Rear: Giant GTM 7 fully adjustable rear shock
Brakes: Magura HS11 special – hydraulic rim brakes

Red box one:

Model: Giant Box One ’99 Freeride series, red – black
Frame: 18.5 6061 t6 alloy frame
Shifters: SRAM ESP 7.0, 3×9 gripshift gears
Derailleur: SRAM ESP 7.0, 3×9 front and rear derailers
Suspension:
Front: Sr Suntour dc90 magnesium triple clamp adjustable forks
Rear: Giant GTM 7 fully adjustable rear shock
Brakes: diatech dp9 pro disc brakes with anodised calipers
quick release alex al-dv22 double wall rims with giant hubs
tioga factory downhill 2.10f tyres
24 speed
sr suntour xr32 crank
vp 565 peddles
selle italia karve seat
giant quick release alloy seat post
ntg a-head set
giant stem and bars

COMMON FAULTS

Unfortunately there was a common design fault with the Giant Box One. It would generally last one or two years then the frame would crack. My personal Giant Box One had this problem and I have seen many more examples with the same issue. Once this happens it is a write off.

articlesgiantboxonefault1
Giant Box One Common Fault
articlesgiantboxonefault2
Giant Box One Common Fault

GALLERY

articlesgiantboxoneblue1
Giant Box One Blue – yellow
articlesgiantboxoneblue2
Giant Box One Blue – yellow
articlesgiantboxoneblue3
Giant Box One Blue – yellow
articlesgiantboxoneblue4
Giant Box One Blue – yellow
articlesgiantboxoneblue5
Giant Box One Blue – yellow
articlesgiantboxoneblue6
Giant Box One Blue – yellow
articlesgiantboxoneblue7
Giant Box One Blue – yellow
articlesgiantboxoneblue8
Giant Box One Blue – yellow
articlesgiantboxoneblue9
Giant Box One Blue – yellow
articlesgiantboxoneblue10
Giant Box One Blue – yellow
articlesgiantboxoneblue11
Giant Box One Blue – yellow
articlesgiantboxoneblue12
Giant Box One Blue – yellow
articlesgiantboxoneblue13
Giant Box One Blue – yellow
articlesgiantboxoneblue14
Giant Box One Blue – yellow
articlesgiantboxoneblue15
Giant Box One Blue – yellow
articlesgiantboxoneblue16
Giant Box One Blue – yellow
articlesgiantboxoneblue17
Giant Box One Blue – yellow

 

articlesgiantboxonered1
Giant Box One Red – Black
articlesgiantboxonered2
Giant Box One Red – Black
articlesgiantboxonered3
Giant Box One Red – Black
articlesgiantboxonered4
Giant Box One Red – Black
articlesgiantboxonered5
Giant Box One Red – Black
articlesgiantboxonered6
Giant Box One Red – Black
articlesgiantboxonered7
Giant Box One Red – Black
articlesgiantboxonered8
Giant Box One Red – Black
articlesgiantboxonered9
Giant Box One Red – Black
articlesgiantboxonered10
Giant Box One Red – Black
articlesgiantboxonered11
Giant Box One Red – Black
articlesgiantboxonered12
Giant Box One Red – Black
articlesgiantboxonered13
Giant Box One Red – Black
articlesgiantboxonered14
Giant Box One Red – Black
articlesgiantboxonered15
Giant Box One Red – Black